Antonio Strad™ Chang Lee Violin

$1,650.00

The Chang Lee Violin is a refined, hand carved instrument with an aged, solid figured maple back and sides, as well as an evenly spaced grained spruce top.

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(11 customer reviews)

Violin Sizing

How to measure for the Violin

Lift the left arm and extend it fully to the side, parallel to the floor with the palm facing upward. Measure from the neck to the middle of the palm.

It’s better to play on an instrument that is a bit smaller than one that is bigger, especially for beginners. See our chart for the approximate sizing.

Also, please feel free to give us a ring. We can help over the phone or even FaceTime, Zoom or Google Hangouts: 800-284-9788

Violin Sizing
Violin SizeArm MeasurementAge
1/32less than 14''1 - 3 YRS
1/1614'' - 15.9''3 - 4 YRS
1/1016'' - 16.9''4 - 5 YRS
1/817'' - 17.9''5 -6 YRS
1/418'' - 19.9''6 - 7 YRS
1/220'' - 21.9''7 - 8 YRS
3/422'' - 22.9''9 - 11 YRS
4/423''+12+ YRS
Pay Over Time
 

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Chang Lee Violin

The Chang Lee Violin is a refined, hand-carved instrument with an aged, solid figured maple back and sides, as well as an evenly spaced grained spruce top. The oil spirit varnish not only gives a beautiful, simple aesthetic, but it also contributes to the Chang Lee Violin’s open and powerful sound and warm tone. The Chang Lee Violin is perfect for those advancing to a playing style with more subtleties and colors.

Available in 4/4 size

VIOLIN FEATURES

  • 100% handmade instrument
  • Professionally setup at our main workshop in San Antonio
  • Solid carved wood
  • 10-year aged spruce top
  • 10-year aged solid figured maple back and sides
  • Inlaid purfling
  • 100% ebony fingerboard, pegs, fittings, and tailpiece
  • Hand-carved French Aubert bridge
  • Zyex Strings

Customer Reviews

5
Based on 11 Reviews

  1. 9 out of 9 people found this helpful
    Carl S.
    Purchased new instead of repairng old violin.

    I always make sure to perform in-depth research on anything I am planning on buying, I’m kind of competitive like that! When my wife’s violin needed $400 for a crack and seem repair, I knew I had to embark on an investigative mission, searching for the best possible replacement for my wife’s violin.
    One thing I noticed about the Chang Lee is its exceptional craftsmanship. We’re not only talking about well-executed manufacturing processes here. What we have is a violin crafted by hand.
    From using solid hardwood to integrating some of the finest elements in the violin world, I can say that the maker knew what he was doing.
    Their craftsmanship is evident even in the violin bridge, you can see tiny little carving marks in it. Super cool!
    We like the Zyex strings because they provide more color and subtleties to one’s playing (that’s what she has on her student level violin as well).
    You can imagine the look in my wife’s eyes when she finally opened the box. The music she played was rewarding enough to let me know I made the right choice.

    Was this helpful? 9

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  2. 5 out of 5 people found this helpful
    Elliott P.
    Love the new sound.

    My teenage daughter has been playing her violin for several years now. Lately, she asked me if she could have a new one for highschool. Ever the accommodating Dad who only wants the best for his little girl, I knew it’s about time she got a ‘real’ violin.
    The Chang Lee was on the upper limit of my budget. As such, I researched a lot to justify the price. After talking to several people, and having Mark at Antonio Strad send a video of this vs. the 5H, Legacy, etc. I knew it was the right choice.
    This violin produces warm, pleasant sound. I just love hearing her practice upstairs. Especially during a global pandemic, I know she’s safe at home instead of spending time with friends.
    My daughter says that these strings are better than what she was using on her old instrument. She thinks her scales are faster and more precise.

    Was this helpful? 5

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  3. 4 out of 4 people found this helpful
    Whitney H.
    Finally a good violin.

    My first violin produces a buzzing sound that is quite annoying. Regardless of how I fine-tune the strings, change the strings, etc, it would still end up with an obnoxious sound. That’s what I get for going cheap on a violin.
    The Chang Lee reignited the passion in me. I first tried a legato before I moved on to a détaché and a martelé. The sound was fantastic. I don’t know what to think without a painful buzz.
    The sound has an excellent resonance that produces a powerful sound with a bright, warm tone. The sound is heavenly, especially when I added subtleties to the piece.

    Was this helpful? 4

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  4. 2 out of 2 people found this helpful
    Rosevelt H.
    I'm in love

    The first thing I look for when buying a violin is its craftsmanship. I know that its sound is only as good as its construction, including the materials used in its creation.
    One thing I noticed about the Chang Lee is its solid-figured back and sides. Most of the violins I see have the wood grain following the violin’s length. This violin doesn’t. The grain runs top to bottom instead of parallel to the surface.
    The design gives it a more defined look. It is like having a textured violin, depending on where you view it. I learned that Antonio Strad uses only decade-old spruce and maple for this violin.
    The fittings, tailpiece, and tuning pegs also look solid and well-crafted. I can also imagine the expert hands of woodcarvers making intricate designs on the violin’s French Aubert bridge.
    The craftsmanship speaks of the company’s thoughtfulness in providing violinists with a beautiful and great-sounding investment.

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  5. One person found this helpful
    Amy A.
    Crazy attention to detail.

    I’ve been playing the violin for years, although not in a professional capacity nor with a degree of seriousness that will make me want to play on stage. There’s no question that Chang Lee is an excellent violin, with its solid craftsmanship that can put to shame more expensive violins.
    I love the color of the varnish, and the slight texture of the top, I never really paid much attention to the grain on my other violin.
    I might be crazy paying attention to all of these little details but the fingerboard’s ebony is very, very dark black. I looked that up on the internet and apparently that is a good sign for ebony wood. Even the French Aubert bridge deserves attention. I see the fine details of its carvings, turning it into a miniature work of art. My other violin the bridge is sadly dirty and slumped back. I wonder if getting a new bridge would help it.
    The sound quality is also excellent. However, I do want to give it time to develop even further. I can only imagine how heavenly its sound will be after a few years of playing. It sounds great now, but time will make it sound even better.
    While it is not the cheapest, the Chang Lee still fits into my budget. And I absolutely recommend others consider this violin.

    Was this helpful? 1

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